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How to get the press to pay attention to you & your music [Level 1 - Fans]
Written by:
Emily Plazek

You might be here because you were reading Level 1 - Fans and wanted to learn more about PR. So. Here it is:

PR (Public Relations): The IMBM takes a lot of freedom using this term: we consider this as any press, or networking with the public (meeting people in general and keeping in touch with them casually -- keep a nice folder in your email inbox or add them to your email list! They want updates on your projects if your music is great!).

Post-show talks with the press crew.

No, it’s not necessarily easy to get writers to pay attention to you in this noisy industry era of so many musicians, but you can still make meaningful relationships with writers who want to cover you -- if you give them a “WIIFM”.

WIIFM means “What’s in it for me?” and think about it -- that’s what most humans think when asked to do a favor. So if you ask someone to write for you, put yourself in their shoes and answer that WIIFM question, depending on what they want. Perhaps you’ll be their connection to more local bands in the area? Perhaps you’ll always give them first coverage of your projects, or invite them to your shows with VIP access? This is an art form, but being open-minded and grateful will get you far.

Maybe you start out by contacting for local blogs, newspapers, TV and radio stations that like to feature local music, and become their friends!  (Google to find the right contact and their email address -- when in doubt, Google and email fearlessly.) Then you can build up to other sources, possibly nationally, that you want to shoot for -- it takes time, but if you build a team to help you, it’s possible.

Be creative with it--- one singer/songwriter we heard about was a sailing aficionado, so instead of trying to get the flooded music magazine to write about her, she approached her favorite sailing magazine. They loved it -- featuring a musical sailor was unique to their magazine, but still covered their niche market.

Remember, if you never ask someone to write about you, you'll probably never get written about. Ask! It’s that simple. Collect some noes and you’ll end up with some yeses.

One VERY important note as to why PR is vital:

We at MIC talk about the 3rd Party Principle often: it’s when someone else recommending your music to a person is more persuasive than you recommending it to that same person. A third party talking about you gives you clout -- as opposed to you talking about yourself, which instinctively makes guards go up. That’s also called “Push vs. Pull Marketing” -- do you like feeling pressured to buy a product (Push marketing), or do you prefer to be so intrigued because of other people talking about it that you explore it yourself (Pull marketing)?

Head back over the Level 1 - Fans and see how PR fits into the big picture of your music career!

How to get the press to pay attention to you & your music [Level 1 - Fans]
How to get the press to pay attention to you & your music [Level 1 - Fans]
MIC is my baby.

You might be here because you were reading Level 1 - Fans and wanted to learn more about PR. So. Here it is:

PR (Public Relations): The IMBM takes a lot of freedom using this term: we consider this as any press, or networking with the public (meeting people in general and keeping in touch with them casually -- keep a nice folder in your email inbox or add them to your email list! They want updates on your projects if your music is great!).

Post-show talks with the press crew.

No, it’s not necessarily easy to get writers to pay attention to you in this noisy industry era of so many musicians, but you can still make meaningful relationships with writers who want to cover you -- if you give them a “WIIFM”.

WIIFM means “What’s in it for me?” and think about it -- that’s what most humans think when asked to do a favor. So if you ask someone to write for you, put yourself in their shoes and answer that WIIFM question, depending on what they want. Perhaps you’ll be their connection to more local bands in the area? Perhaps you’ll always give them first coverage of your projects, or invite them to your shows with VIP access? This is an art form, but being open-minded and grateful will get you far.

Maybe you start out by contacting for local blogs, newspapers, TV and radio stations that like to feature local music, and become their friends!  (Google to find the right contact and their email address -- when in doubt, Google and email fearlessly.) Then you can build up to other sources, possibly nationally, that you want to shoot for -- it takes time, but if you build a team to help you, it’s possible.

Be creative with it--- one singer/songwriter we heard about was a sailing aficionado, so instead of trying to get the flooded music magazine to write about her, she approached her favorite sailing magazine. They loved it -- featuring a musical sailor was unique to their magazine, but still covered their niche market.

Remember, if you never ask someone to write about you, you'll probably never get written about. Ask! It’s that simple. Collect some noes and you’ll end up with some yeses.

One VERY important note as to why PR is vital:

We at MIC talk about the 3rd Party Principle often: it’s when someone else recommending your music to a person is more persuasive than you recommending it to that same person. A third party talking about you gives you clout -- as opposed to you talking about yourself, which instinctively makes guards go up. That’s also called “Push vs. Pull Marketing” -- do you like feeling pressured to buy a product (Push marketing), or do you prefer to be so intrigued because of other people talking about it that you explore it yourself (Pull marketing)?

Head back over the Level 1 - Fans and see how PR fits into the big picture of your music career!

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