our team

services

SANCTUARY

Aenean tellus urna, vehicula quis quam vel, finibus sollicitudin quam maecenas mollis risus eu purus faucibus efficitur.

Laneway: Product Development (Section 2)
Written by:
Emily Plazek
Product Development is a Laneway because you'll always conduct these activities in your career.

The Product Development laneway is about (1) your music, (2) your health, and (3) living life. Yeah, we might’ve fooled you: the title “Product Development” seems like it’s just about your music, but it’s also about you as a human. Your mind, your body, your unique personality, and the experiences you live through -- all of that feeds into the music you create.

Product Development is a laneway up the center because you’ll always be conducting these activities daily, in little bits, so it builds up across time (trust us, it works). This is about you supporting the music career work you need to do, and upkeeping the machine that accomplishes that work: You. Your body. Your mind. Your drive. Your passion. 

Pace your marathon, and the music you want to create/the performer you want to be will follow.

1) Your music

Skill vs. Talent - can you create it?

Some people pick up a trombone and magically serenade with little effort. Some people open their mouths and cringe, even at themselves. If you "don’t have talent", there’s still hope: you can create skill.

Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers shares the findings of his research into what makes “great” people “great." We’re talking the best guitarists, wrestlers, violinists, runners, chess players in history -- Malcolm set out to learn whether it was sheer talent or something else that made them so successful. He found that all the greatest people in their realms could account for an average of about 10,000 hours of practice to achieve their “greatness” (usually throughout a lifetime of consistent practice), and many did not attribute “pure talent” as a factor. In fact, some said they weren’t naturally talented, but they kept at it, and over all those hours they created their skills by their own doing.

Oftentimes people with natural talent get left in the dust by the “non-naturally-talented” people who exceed the sheer amount of hours practicing their craft. This is great news for both talented and “non-talented” people -- if you chip away consistently for a long time, you will either increase or cultivate your skills to be “great” in whatever way that means to you.

Actually, that means that whole “Practice makes perfect” adage wasn’t bull, right?

One of our indie musicians, composer Andrew Dewey, leading his orchestra.

Let’s talk about motive.

In her book Yes Please, SNL and Parks & Recreation comedian Amy Poehler comments on how some newcomer-comedians want to skip straight to being famous -- which doesn’t make sense to her, because “the doing of the thing is the thing.” Meaning, many comedians start out and don’t like doing things like improv troupes and classes, but they want to immediately be on SNL.

The IMBM saw this same concept often in its research. It's reminiscent of the moral of the epic music book Effortless Mastery which shares why motive in your music career means everything. If you’re in the music career game for fame or money or to feel cool, maybe sit back and have a conversation with yourself. It takes a ton of self-awareness to realize this about yourself (more on that later in this article) -- but it’s a pretty difficult career choice to accomplish those things, and the success-chances could be slim because your definition of success may be extrinsically-linked (based on things outside of your control, like other people’s opinions of you).

If you know there’s a piece of your soul that loves music so much you can’t live life without it, your motive is probably A-okay. This topic is up to you to reflect upon.

Don’t overthink whether your music is “good” or "bad"...

There’s no such thing, really, as objectively “great” music because, well, it's art. Art is subjective; everyone gets something different out of looking at a painting -- why would music be any different? Plus, maybe that girl who studies classical composition in college has a different idea of what “great” means than does the college freshman jamming to rap in his dorm with his buds.

Objectively, once you achieve an industry standard level of mixing, mastering, and songwriting into your songs, it’s good “enough," and that’s all you need.  

There’s an audience out there for every song, and they’re waiting -- they want your music. Don’t overthink that. It’s about nailing your music's unique, genuine quality down, then getting it into peoples' hands (read more about that with Cartoon Network composer, Davin Wood, here.)

… go for different.

If your music is genuinely you, it’ll be “differentiated,” and if you’re going to concern yourself with any part of song-creating, we recommend you focus on that. Think about it: at a certain point you get sick of the same old music over and over again, just like you’d get sick of tacos if you had them over and over again. Yeah, tacos rock -- but not for breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and dessert every day.

Humans crave novelty. If your music is unique, you’ll be satisfying cravings. 

How do you make unique music? There’s no real answer for that, we'd be blowing hot air if we tried to tell you we figured out that life mystery-- but if you be yourself, doesn’t that seem like a killer route? There’s only 1 you, so there’d be no other music like yours if it’s genuine.

So how do you make something genuinely you? Go to the source: you (duh).

2) Your Health

Why does health matter? I’ll sleep when I die! YOLO.

It’s not a luxury to take care of your physical and mental health -- it’s the only way you can drive your machine through life and do what you wanna do (especially music careers). Otherwise, you’re in pain or exhausted or anxious or sad or distracted or annoyed and you just don’t get work done.

Optimizing your health isn’t necessarily only about eating vegetables, logging hours on the elliptical, going to a therapist, or reading self-help books. Sure, those can all be part of your equation  -- but they all feed into the part of health that the IMBM cares about most: self-awareness. It’s the running dialogue in your mind. Your mind can either be strong or weak-- it’s a muscle in that way.

Read more about this critical topic by clicking here!
Pittsburgh, dusk.

... and did you know that "Living Life" is vital for making your music?

Being an indie musician means the work is in your hands, but that doesn’t mean it should be all you dedicate yourself to. How else would you create relatable music? For example: do you think listening to a forced love song from someone who’s been too busy working to have a relationship would be particularly satisfying?

Living your life is what makes your mind unique, therefore making your music unique -- and maybe the fact that having fun, seeing the world, or being with the people you love is contributing to your career will let you ease off yourself a bit.

Remember, the name of the game is pacing the marathon: creating skill bit by bit, while upkeeping this machine you’re forced to do all the work from. And one more note:

Sometimes truly resting --whether it's losing yourself on a park walk or going skydiving in Jamaica-- will unlock a whole new level of your creativity. You’ll come out of rest like a raging superhero of inspiration as your mind assimilates the lessons you’re learning in your experiences. It’s like how the fitness world advises to take rest days for your muscles to heal; or how about our calendar that has 2 rest days scheduled in, literally every 5 days?

Don’t be afraid to rest. It might be the best thing you ever do for your music.

Onward to a topic that we’re especially excited to share our take on: Business Basics.

Or, read more about Product Development, includes interviews with indie music celebrities, here!
Laneway: Product Development (Section 2)
Laneway: Product Development (Section 2)
MIC is my baby.
Product Development is a Laneway because you'll always conduct these activities in your career.

The Product Development laneway is about (1) your music, (2) your health, and (3) living life. Yeah, we might’ve fooled you: the title “Product Development” seems like it’s just about your music, but it’s also about you as a human. Your mind, your body, your unique personality, and the experiences you live through -- all of that feeds into the music you create.

Product Development is a laneway up the center because you’ll always be conducting these activities daily, in little bits, so it builds up across time (trust us, it works). This is about you supporting the music career work you need to do, and upkeeping the machine that accomplishes that work: You. Your body. Your mind. Your drive. Your passion. 

Pace your marathon, and the music you want to create/the performer you want to be will follow.

1) Your music

Skill vs. Talent - can you create it?

Some people pick up a trombone and magically serenade with little effort. Some people open their mouths and cringe, even at themselves. If you "don’t have talent", there’s still hope: you can create skill.

Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers shares the findings of his research into what makes “great” people “great." We’re talking the best guitarists, wrestlers, violinists, runners, chess players in history -- Malcolm set out to learn whether it was sheer talent or something else that made them so successful. He found that all the greatest people in their realms could account for an average of about 10,000 hours of practice to achieve their “greatness” (usually throughout a lifetime of consistent practice), and many did not attribute “pure talent” as a factor. In fact, some said they weren’t naturally talented, but they kept at it, and over all those hours they created their skills by their own doing.

Oftentimes people with natural talent get left in the dust by the “non-naturally-talented” people who exceed the sheer amount of hours practicing their craft. This is great news for both talented and “non-talented” people -- if you chip away consistently for a long time, you will either increase or cultivate your skills to be “great” in whatever way that means to you.

Actually, that means that whole “Practice makes perfect” adage wasn’t bull, right?

One of our indie musicians, composer Andrew Dewey, leading his orchestra.

Let’s talk about motive.

In her book Yes Please, SNL and Parks & Recreation comedian Amy Poehler comments on how some newcomer-comedians want to skip straight to being famous -- which doesn’t make sense to her, because “the doing of the thing is the thing.” Meaning, many comedians start out and don’t like doing things like improv troupes and classes, but they want to immediately be on SNL.

The IMBM saw this same concept often in its research. It's reminiscent of the moral of the epic music book Effortless Mastery which shares why motive in your music career means everything. If you’re in the music career game for fame or money or to feel cool, maybe sit back and have a conversation with yourself. It takes a ton of self-awareness to realize this about yourself (more on that later in this article) -- but it’s a pretty difficult career choice to accomplish those things, and the success-chances could be slim because your definition of success may be extrinsically-linked (based on things outside of your control, like other people’s opinions of you).

If you know there’s a piece of your soul that loves music so much you can’t live life without it, your motive is probably A-okay. This topic is up to you to reflect upon.

Don’t overthink whether your music is “good” or "bad"...

There’s no such thing, really, as objectively “great” music because, well, it's art. Art is subjective; everyone gets something different out of looking at a painting -- why would music be any different? Plus, maybe that girl who studies classical composition in college has a different idea of what “great” means than does the college freshman jamming to rap in his dorm with his buds.

Objectively, once you achieve an industry standard level of mixing, mastering, and songwriting into your songs, it’s good “enough," and that’s all you need.  

There’s an audience out there for every song, and they’re waiting -- they want your music. Don’t overthink that. It’s about nailing your music's unique, genuine quality down, then getting it into peoples' hands (read more about that with Cartoon Network composer, Davin Wood, here.)

… go for different.

If your music is genuinely you, it’ll be “differentiated,” and if you’re going to concern yourself with any part of song-creating, we recommend you focus on that. Think about it: at a certain point you get sick of the same old music over and over again, just like you’d get sick of tacos if you had them over and over again. Yeah, tacos rock -- but not for breakfast, snack, lunch, snack, dinner, and dessert every day.

Humans crave novelty. If your music is unique, you’ll be satisfying cravings. 

How do you make unique music? There’s no real answer for that, we'd be blowing hot air if we tried to tell you we figured out that life mystery-- but if you be yourself, doesn’t that seem like a killer route? There’s only 1 you, so there’d be no other music like yours if it’s genuine.

So how do you make something genuinely you? Go to the source: you (duh).

2) Your Health

Why does health matter? I’ll sleep when I die! YOLO.

It’s not a luxury to take care of your physical and mental health -- it’s the only way you can drive your machine through life and do what you wanna do (especially music careers). Otherwise, you’re in pain or exhausted or anxious or sad or distracted or annoyed and you just don’t get work done.

Optimizing your health isn’t necessarily only about eating vegetables, logging hours on the elliptical, going to a therapist, or reading self-help books. Sure, those can all be part of your equation  -- but they all feed into the part of health that the IMBM cares about most: self-awareness. It’s the running dialogue in your mind. Your mind can either be strong or weak-- it’s a muscle in that way.

Read more about this critical topic by clicking here!
Pittsburgh, dusk.

... and did you know that "Living Life" is vital for making your music?

Being an indie musician means the work is in your hands, but that doesn’t mean it should be all you dedicate yourself to. How else would you create relatable music? For example: do you think listening to a forced love song from someone who’s been too busy working to have a relationship would be particularly satisfying?

Living your life is what makes your mind unique, therefore making your music unique -- and maybe the fact that having fun, seeing the world, or being with the people you love is contributing to your career will let you ease off yourself a bit.

Remember, the name of the game is pacing the marathon: creating skill bit by bit, while upkeeping this machine you’re forced to do all the work from. And one more note:

Sometimes truly resting --whether it's losing yourself on a park walk or going skydiving in Jamaica-- will unlock a whole new level of your creativity. You’ll come out of rest like a raging superhero of inspiration as your mind assimilates the lessons you’re learning in your experiences. It’s like how the fitness world advises to take rest days for your muscles to heal; or how about our calendar that has 2 rest days scheduled in, literally every 5 days?

Don’t be afraid to rest. It might be the best thing you ever do for your music.

Onward to a topic that we’re especially excited to share our take on: Business Basics.

Or, read more about Product Development, includes interviews with indie music celebrities, here!

Follow us on our Social Networks

Subscribe to get our latest news